Our Environment.
Our Home.
OUR CHALLENGE.

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The Otsego County Conservation Association has announced that it will send eight Otsego County school students to Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Environmental Education Camp this summer through a countywide competitive essay contest.

Otsego County students ages 11-14 are invited to compete for camperships through an essay that answers the question “What does energy sustainability mean to you?”  Contest winners will receive a week-long stay at a New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Summer Camp, where they will spend their week immersed in the natural environment and enjoy a balance of environmental education, sportsman education, and outdoor fun.

“With our growing reliance on electronic devices, it is more important than ever to unplug and get outside,” said OCCA Executive Director Leslie Orzetti. “I’m thrilled that OCCA can continue to offer our children this great opportunity. Our past winners have had a wonderful time at DEC camp.” In 2018, OCCA provided camperships for eight students.

Winning essays will be chosen from participating Otsego County schools and Otsego County applicants at large. The deadline for essay submissions is January 4, 2019. Winning essays will be chosen by January 11 and notified immediately. Contest winners will be given a special code by OCCA which will be used to register for DEC camp.

“We’re hoping teachers will be able to incorporate this year’s theme into their classroom learning.  In these uncertain times, it is important for all students to know that what they do has an impact on the larger community,” Orzetti said. “Camp registration opens in January  and we know they fill up fast.”

The contest is open to students ages 11-14 (must be age 11 by December 26, 2019), including students who are home-schooled. Complete contest rules and requirements are available by e-mailing director@occainfo.org or by calling (607) 547-4488. Teachers who plan to assign the essay to their students are asked to contact OCCA in order to be recognized as a participating school.

OCCA is a private, non-profit environmental membership organization dedicated to promoting the appreciation and sustainable use of Otsego County’s natural resources through education, advocacy, resource management, research, planning and practice. For more information on OCCA, or to support programming, call (607) 547-4488 or visit www.occainfo.org.

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December 3, 2018:  Vol. 12, No. 12

SAVE THE DATE

A Looming Threat: Emerald Ash Borer

December 12 – 630pm: Otsego Now/Otsego County Chamber Office, 189 Main St., Suite 500, Oneonta

The emerald ash borer is creeping into Otsego County. This highly-destructive insect attacks and kills ash trees, which make up a significant portion of our forests and parks. Catskill Regional Invasive Species Partnership (CRISP) Field Projects Manager, Dan Snider will provide an update on the emerald ash borer infestation in the Catskills region. Come learn about emerald ash borer biology, ash tree identification, and signs of emerald ash borer infestations. We will also discuss best management practices for infested areas, and how you can contribute to research programs to preserve ash trees on our landscape. Program is free, but space is limited. Register as https://occainfo.org/signup/.

 

Solar Info Session & Potluck

December 15 – 300-530pm: Tanner Hill Herb Farm, 294 Tanner Hill Rd., Cooperstown

The Leatherstocking Young Farmers Coalition invites beginning, sustainable farmers in the Leatherstocking Region (50 mile radius of Cooperstown) to a Solar Info Session and Potluck. Join fellow farmers to talk about renewable energy options, socialize, and share food together. The session will include representatives of Solstice Community Solar, who will provide information on solar farm opt-in programs in Otsego County, and Bennett Sandler, of Heat Smart Otsego to discuss air-source and ground-source heat pumps and wood heating systems. As a farm-driven collective, the Leatherstocking Young Farmers Coalition provides a space for socializing, skills and resource sharing, and advocacy. The chapter creates a platform for building and strengthening the community of sustainable farmers and ranchers within their first 10 years of growing or starting a new farm in this region, but is also open to apprentices and seasoned farmers. Please bring a dish or drink to share. For more information, contact Greta at leatherstocking.nyfc@gmail.com.

Additional Solar Info Session

December 6 – 530-730pm: Best Western Hotel, 50 Commons Drive, Cooperstown

Solstice is a mission-driven organization dedicated to bringing affordable solar power to the 80% of Americans who cannot install a rooftop system. Solstice conducts comprehensive marketing campaigns to educate communities about community solar projects in their area, partnering with trusted local organizations to distribute community solar to their membership, conducting outreach efforts and managing the customer experience. There is currently an opportunity to buy into a new solar installation right in your own back yard in Laurens.  Come to the information session and help fill up our local solar farm while saving up to 10% on your electric bill.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Plastic Bag Challenge

There’s still time for schools to sign up for our first-ever plastic bag challenge! The school that collects the most film plastic (per capita) between January 1 and April 1, 2019 will win. Participating schools will receive a collecting bin, courtesy of Casella. The challenge seeks to educate that bags and film plastics can be recycled through grocery stores and other retailers, but not through regular curbside pickup or at the transfer stations. Schools can also sign up to participate in a national challenge sponsored by Trex. Registration deadline is December 15. Contact OCCA at (607) 547-4488 for more details or to sign up.

 

Christmas Lights Recycling

Through December 24 at Lowe’s

A number of Lowe’s stores in our region are accepting used Christmas and holiday lights for free recycling. Participating stores include Lowe’s in Oneonta, Norwich and Herkimer. Lights can be dropped off for free in a bin near the customer service area during normal store hours. Call your local Lowe’s to confirm participation.

If you don’t have a Lowe’s nearby, consider a mail-in program through Holiday LEDS (https://www.holidayleds.com/christmas-light-recycling-program.aspx). In addition to recycling your old lights, they’ll send you a coupon good for a 15% discount on LED Christmas lights through their online store.

Otsego Land Trust is Hiring!

The Finance and Office Manager is responsible for managing the organization’s finances and financial reporting and works closely with the Executive Director and Board Treasurer. He/she manages the office’s operational systems, utilities and facility needs. The Finance and Office Manager reports to the Executive Director, and works with the staff/Board of Directors as projects require. Like all members of OLT’s staff, the Finance and Office Manager assists with tasks outside his or her specific position requirements when the demands of a small organization require it. Please send resume, cover letter, and references to patricia@otsegolandtrust.org. Deadline for applying is December 14.

Thank You!

From the bottom of our hearts we would like to thank our loyal Ecobulletin readers for another wonderful year here at OCCA.  Your support of our organization is what keeps us going and on our toes to bring you the best information and programming we can, and to help preserve the place that we all call home.  If you want to find out more details about what we were up to this year, stay tuned for a link to the Annual Report on our website in January.

 

It’s Holiday Time!

To paraphrase the Grinch, that means lots of packages, boxes and bags. This year, when unpacking all the goodies coming to your door, pay special attention to the packaging. Foam packaging, bubble wrap, tissue paper and air pillows can all be used again, if you’re shipping gifts to distant family and friends. If you have no need for the material, check with local shipping stores to see if they can use it (call first, don’t just drop it at their door). If it can’t be reused or donated, make sure to dispose of it properly:

Cardboard: break down and flatten boxes; take clean, dry, flattened boxes to your transfer station or set out with curbside recycling.

Bubblewrap and air pillows: If bubblewrap has a foil backing, it must be disposed of in the trash. Otherwise, bubblewrap and deflated air pillows can be recycled at grocery stores and other retailers that take back plastic bags and film wrap. Visit https://www.plasticfilmrecycling.org/recycling-bags-and-wraps/find-drop-off-location/ to learn which nearby retailers participate.

For a comprehensive list of ‘How Do I Get Rid Of?’ in Otsego County, visit http://occainfo.org/item-specific-recycling-compiled-resources/ or http://www.otsegocounty.com/depts/sw/HowdoIgetridof.htm

Emerald ash borer to be the topic of a presentation in Oneonta on Wednesday, December 12.

(ONEONTA) — The City of Oneonta and the Otsego County Conservation Association will be co-sponsoring a talk on the emerald ash borer on Wednesday, December 12 at 6:30pm. This free talk will take place at the Otsego County Chamber of Commerce, 189 Main Street, Suite 500.

An invasive insect from eastern Asia, the emerald ash borer (EAB) attacks and kills all species of ash trees. Since it was first found in the United States in 2002, EAB has been responsible for the death of millions of trees in the United States and Canada. Its presence in Otsego County was confirmed in 2014 in Unadilla.

“The emerald ash borer continues to expand into Otsego County,” said Jeff O’Handley, OCCA’s program director. “It’s especially important for people in the southern and western parts of the county to be aware of this pest and the impact it can have.”

The program features a presentation by Dan Snider, field projects manager for the Catskill Regional Invasive Species Partnership (CRISP). Snider will cover emerald ash borer biology, ash tree identification, and signs of emerald ash borer infestations. The program will also include a discussion of best management practices for infested areas, and how citizens can contribute to research programs to preserve ash trees in the landscape.

In 2017, the City of Oneonta received an Urban and Community Forestry Grant to develop and implement the Emerald Ash Borer Maintenance Program. As part of the plan, the City removed a number of ash high-risk ash trees from streets and parks, inoculated others with insecticide to protect against infestation, and conducted a number of outreach and education programs. Judy Pangman, Community Development Director for the City of Oneonta, will be on hand to discuss the progress of the program.

Ryan Mathews, Engineer I for the City of Oneonta, said the tree removals were done in the interest of safety.

“Once the emerald ash borer arrives, the trees die pretty quickly,” Mathews said. “Falling limbs represent a risk to public health and could also result in significant property damage.”

“At this point, it’s not a matter of ‘if,’ it’s a matter of when,” O’Handley said, in reference to the emerald ash borer infestation. “We think it’s important that people understand as much about the emerald ash borer as possible so that they can decide what to do on their own property.”

The program is free and open to the public. For more information, contact OCCA at (607) 282-4087.

The program is made possible by an Urban Community Forestry grant received by the City of Oneonta. The Urban Community Forestry grants are funded through the State Environmental Protection Fund. They are part of New York’s ongoing environmental initiatives to promote clean air, clean water, energy savings and habitat creation and to address invasive species, environmental justice and urban sprawl. UCF grants are awarded by the Department of Environmental Conservation.

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ReplyReply allForward

Otsego County Conservation Association, in conjunction with the Otsego County Department of Solid Waste and Planning and Casella Resource Solutions are holding a film plastic recycling challenge for schools, to begin in 2019. The program aims to promote proper recycling of grocery bags and other film plastics, which cannot be recycled through traditional recycling programs. The challenge is open to all public and private K-12 school buildings located in Otsego County.

The challenge will run from January 1 to April 1, 2019. During the challenge, students and teachers are asked to collect clean, dry film plastic, including single-use grocery bags, Ziploc-style food bags, newspaper bags, wood pellet bags and more in bins at the school. Each week, students will weigh and record the amount of film plastic collected, and a volunteer will deliver the collected plastic to a participating retailer for recycling.

“New York State has required that retailers collect and recycle plastic bags and other film plastics since 2009,” said Leslie Orzetti, OCCA’s executive director. “Yet a lot of people are not aware of that. We’re hoping the challenge will make more people aware of this important program and the kids will educate their families about the importance of recycling.”

Schools will be divided into two categories for the competition: Elementary School and Middle/High School, and have the option of being part of the national competition sponsored by Trex©. Participating schools will compete against each other to collect the highest amount of plastic film per capita. All participating schools will receive a certificate of recognition. Prizes for winners in each category will be announced at a later date.

According to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, New Yorkers use more than 23 billion plastic bags each year. Most film plastic ends up in landfills. Though film plastic can be recycled into new bags, film plastic, and rigid materials such as composite lumber, they cannot be collected as part of Otsego County’s traditional recycling program, said Karen Sullivan, Otsego County’s Director of Solid Waste.

“The recycling facilities our plastics go to are not set up to handle film plastics. Bags and stretch film get tangled in machinery and lead to costly breakdowns,” Sullivan said.

Over the last year, recycling costs have soared, due to tighter contamination standards. Where Otsego County used to receive a rebate for recyclables, we now must pay.

“Keeping bags and film out of our recycling stream will help keep our costs down,” said Sullivan.

Schools that are interested in taking part in the Plastic Bag Challenge should contact Otsego County Conservation Association at (607) 547-4488.

Founded in 1968, Otsego County Conservation Association is a private, non-profit membership group dedicated to promoting the appreciation and sustainable use of Otsego County’s natural resources through education, advocacy, resource management, research, planning and practice. For more information on OCCA, or to donate, visit www.occainfo.org

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Hunting and its role in wildlife management and conservation will be the topic of the next Be Informed Lecture Series on Wednesday, November 14 at 6:30pm. The program, co-sponsored by Otsego County Conservation Association and Mohican Farm, will be offered at the Clark Sports Center, 124 County Road 52, Cooperstown.

“Hunting is an activity that is important on many levels,” said Leslie Orzetti, OCCA’s executive director. “With the regular hunting season just around the corner, this is a good time to cover this topic, and we’re excited to have three well-qualified speakers to bring diverse viewpoints to the topic.”

Three speakers will present on different aspects related to hunting. Bob Pierce, an avid outdoorsman and hunter education instructor, will cover hunting from the sportsmen’s perspective. Wildlife Biologist Selinda Brandon from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation will discuss hunting as a wildlife management tool. Tom Salo, board member for the Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society, will discuss impacts of lead ammunition on humans and non-target wildlife.

The program is free, though pre-registration is appreciated. For more information or to sign up, contact OCCA at (607) 547-4488 or visit https://occainfo.org/signup/.

The Be Informed lecture series is a joint program of Otsego County Conservation Association and Mohican Farm. Founded in 1968, OCCA is a private, non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the appreciation and sustainable use of Otsego County’s natural resources through education, advocacy, resource management, research, planning, and practice. For more information on OCCA, or to donate, visit www.occainfo.org

The Mission of The Clark Foundation’s Mohican Farm is to promote broad-based sustainable practices throughout the Clark Foundation, the Village of Cooperstown, and the surrounding region in cooperation with like-minded institutions and organizations.

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Due to impending poor weather, OCCA is canceling the hike to Mud Lake in Riddell State Park scheduled for October 27, 2018. No alternate date is available; however, OCCA will be holding a snowshoe walk in the park in early 2019 and another walk in early spring, dates to be announced at a later date.

Otsego County Conservation Association’s Nature Walk series continues on Saturday, October 27 in Robert V. Riddell State Park in Davenport. Steve Kent leads this 3.5-mile, 4-hour hike, which will traverse a variety of forest types, makes a stop at a 30-foot waterfall, and leads to Mud Lake, a sphagnum bog on top of South Hill. Along the way, Steve will share the history of the land that was in the Riddell family for five generations. Steve and his wife, Trish Riddell Kent donated the land to the state in 2005. Participants should bring water, a snack, and wear appropriate clothing and footwear. Portions of the trail are steep and may be muddy or icy, depending on weather. Meet at noon at the parking area of the Pine Lake Environmental Campus of Hartwick College, 1894 Charlotte Creek Road, and carpool to the hike’s starting point.

The program is free, though pre-registration is requested. For more information, visit www.occainfo.org, or call OCCA at (607) 547-4488.

Founded in 1968, Otsego County Conservation Association is a private, non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the appreciation and sustainable use of Otsego County’s natural resources through education, research, resource management, advocacy, planning and practice. For more information, or to donate, visit www.occainfo.org.

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New York Department of Environmental Conservation Senior Forester, Nathan Funk will lead an informal walk in Basswood Pond State Forest in Burlington on Saturday, October 20, beginning at 10am. The walk, part of Otsego County Conservation Association’s nature walk series, will cover aspects of the forest’s history, current and planned management activities, including a timber harvest, and the importance of the forest for recreation. Basswood Pond State Forest is a 720-acre multiuse forest that includes 7.5 miles of trails for hiking, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing, a 15-acre pond stocked with rainbow trout annually. Participants should meet at the Basswood Pond parking lot, Conservation Road, Burlington.

On Saturday, October 27, Steve Kent leads a walk to Mud Lake in Robert V. Riddell State Park. This 3.5-mile, 4-hour hike traverses a variety of forest types, makes a stop at a 30-foot waterfall, and leads to Mud Lake, a sphagnum bog on top of South Hill. Along the way, Steve will share the history of the land that was in the Riddell family for five generations. Steve and his wife, Trish Riddell Kent donated the land to the state in 2005. Participants should bring water, a snack, and wear appropriate clothing and footwear. This is a moderately-strenuous hike. Meet at the parking area of the Pine Lake Environmental Campus of Hartwick College, 1894 Charlotte Creek Road, Oneonta, and we’ll carpool to the hike’s starting point.

Both programs are free, though pre-registration is requested. For more information, visit www.occainfo.org, or call OCCA at (607) 547-4488.

Founded in 1968, Otsego County Conservation Association is a private, non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the appreciation and sustainable use of Otsego County’s natural resources through education, research, resource management, advocacy, planning and practice. For more information, or to donate, visit www.occainfo.org.

The first annual Heat Smart Otsego Campaign kicks off on October 17 with an event at Foothills Performing Arts Center in Oneonta. The event, organized by Otsego County Conservation Association, will run from 6:30-8:30pm and is free.

The event will feature speakers Jay Egg and Bennett Sandler. The founder of EggGeothermal, Egg will discuss the basics of geothermal, and examine how far geothermal can go towards a renewable energy future.

Sandler, Campaign Director for Heat Smart Otsego, will present detailed information on all aspects of the Heat Smart Otsego campaign, providing an introduction to the technologies as well as information on pricing and incentives available to those that install these technologies.

Funded by a grant from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), Heat Smart Otsego will introduce renewable heating and cooling technologies to building owners across Otsego County.  These technologies include air source heat pumps, ground source heat pumps (geothermal), pellet stoves and modern wood boilers with thermal storage. Attendees will have the opportunity to sign up for free home visits from any of the selected installer partners as well as a free energy audit as a first step toward evaluating the most cost-effective, energy saving option for their home or business.

The Heat Smart Otsego Kickoff Event is free. For more information, contact Campaign Director Bennett Sandler at (607) 435-1364 or campaigndirector@occainfo.org.

Heat Smart Otsego is funded through the middle of 2021 by the Clean Heating and Cooling Community Campaign initiative, which is administered by NYSERDA.  The initiative supports Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s ambitious clean energy goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent by 2030 and 80 percent by 2050.

Founded in 1968, Otsego County Conservation Association is a private, non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the appreciation and sustainable use of Otsego County’s natural resources through education, research, resource management, advocacy, planning and practice. For more information, or to donate, visit www.occainfo.org.

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Save the Date

Trees – Guardians of the Susquehanna (A Riparian Buffer Walk in Cooperstown)

October 6 – 1100am: Doubleday Field, Cooperstown

Join OCCA Executive Director Leslie Orzetti as she guides you through the streets of Cooperstown following Willow Brook from Doubleday Field to Otsego Lake.  The walk will talk about trees as a vital part of the stream ecosystem, their benefits, and programs that help restore riparian buffer ecosystems.  Other stops on the walk include Lakefront Park and ending at Council Rock. The program is sponsored by the Village of Cooperstown under an Urban Tree Grant from the NY Department of Environmental Conservation.  Program is free, registration is encouraged by not necessary.  To register, visit: https://occainfo.org/signup/.

 

Get the Kids Out – Trees!

October 8 – 1000am: Mohican Farm/Spaulding Estate, Cooperstown

Need something to do on Columbus Day? Come to Mohican Farm and explore the world of trees. We’ll search the property and learn how to tell different kinds from each other, understand the role trees play in our world, and have fun! Meet at OCCA’s office at Mohican Farm, 7207 State Highway 80, Cooperstown. Free. Register at: https://occainfo.org/signup/.

Ag Plastic Recycling Collection

October 11 – 800-1100am: Northern Transfer Station, Cooperstown

October 13 – 800-1100am: Southern Transfer Station, Cooperstown

Drop off used agricultural film plastic for recycling. Accepted materials include bale wrap, bunker silo cover, silage/ag bags and greenhouse plastic. Excess dirt/feed must be shaken off as much as possible, and plastic must be sorted according to type. Free, but please contact OCCA with questions or to pre-register. PLEASE NOTE wood pellet bags WILL NOT be accepted. Wood pellet bags may be dropped off at most stores that accept grocery bags for recycling.

Meet Your State Forester

October 20 – 1000am: Basswood Pond State Forest – Conservation Road Parking Area

State Forester Nathan Funk will lead an informative walk through Basswood Pond State Forest.  He will talk about the history, planned forestry actions, and recreational opportunities at the forest. Program is free, registration is encouraged but not necessary.  To register, visit: https://occainfo.org/signup/.

 

Over the Top! Mud Lake

October 27 – Noon: Pine Lake Environmental Campus, Charlotte Creek Road, Davenport

Join Steve Kent for an invigorating walk to Mud Lake in Robert V. Riddell State Park. This 3.5-hour, 4.5-mile hike traverses woods rich in beauty, including a 30-foot waterfall, oak and hemlock groves, and Mud Lake, a sphagnum bog at the top of South Hill. Along the way, Steve will share the history of the land that was donated by Steve and his wife, Trish Riddell Kent, in 2005. We will meet at Pine Lake Environmental Campus of Hartwick College on Charlotte Creek Road and carpool to Gersoni Road to start. Bring snack/light lunch to eat on the trail, water, and proper clothing. Register at:  https://occainfo.org/signup/.

Announcements

 

Farm Insurance Workshop

October 3 –500pm-700pm: Center for Agricultural Development and Entrepreneurship (CADE)

CADE is hosting a workshop educating farmers on their insurance needs. Cecil Davis from Bramely Agency in Delhi will discuss agritourism insurance, workers compensation, disability, product liability and other important insurance requirements related for farm businesses. For more information and to register online go to:http://www.cadefarms.org/events-1/

 

Glimmerglass Film Days

Glimmerglass Film Days, a program of Otsego 2000, features screenings of award-winning films, as well as encounters and collaborations with internationally known artists, activists, filmmakers, and scholars. The four-day series is further enlivened by art exhibits, local foods, brews, wines, and cocktails, as well as  guided hikes and walks, all designed to celebrate the natural, cultural, and historic resources of the Cooperstown region. Film Days is curated by Margaret Parsons, founder and director of the film program at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.  The film days this year are slated for November 8-12. For more information and purchase individual film tickets go to: http://www.glimmerglassfilmdays.org/

 

Soil Health and Cover Crop Meeting

October 9 – 1030am-330pm: Morris Conference Center, SUNY Oneonta

Otsego County Soil & Water Conservation District will host a Soil Health and Cover Crop meeting. Guest speakers Steve Lorraine, Karl Czymmeck, and Steve Groff will lead discussions on cover crops, improving soil health, soil biology and more. Suitable for crop farmers, folks with livestock and landowners who have an interest in saving and improving soil quality for the next generation. Coffee, doughnuts and lunch will be served. RSVP to Otsego County Soil & Water Conservation District at (607) 547-8337 ext 4, or email weaver@otsegosoilandwater.com by October 2.

Open Studio – Dave and Ann Kiehm

October 13 – 100-500pm: 1020 County Highway 46, Oneonta

Local artists Dave and Ann Kiehm once again open their studios for an afternoon of art and conversation. The Kiehms draw inspiration from our natural world to create stunning works of art. For more information, contact (315) 794-8425.

Upper Susquehanna Watershed Forum

The third annual Upper Susquehanna Watershed Forum comes back to Oneonta on October 18 at SUNY Oneonta Morris Conference Center.  Come learn about what our area is doing to protect our waterways and be good stewards of the Chesapeake Bay.  Presentations include information on local work as well as regional and Chesapeake Bay wide work.  The conference is free and open to the public.  For more information and to register see: http://nylcvef.org/events/upper-susquehanna-watershed-forum/

 

Community Shared Solar Opportunities

Southern Tier Solar

Community solar is a program that greatly increases equitable access to locally produced solar energy. Community solar links a customer’s utility bill directly to a local solar farm, allowing them to go solar without installing solar on their home. A customer’s share of the electricity produced on the solar farm is credited directly to their NYSEG utility bill each month. Any NYSEG customer can sign up: renters, homeowners, businesses, and non-profits. To learn more about how you can save money on your electric bill, protect the environment, and support the local solar economy, check out our event schedule for Otsego County:

 

Solstice

Solstice is a mission-driven organization dedicated to bringing affordable solar power to the 80% of Americans who cannot install a rooftop system. Solstice conducts comprehensive marketing campaigns to educate communities about community solar projects in their area, partnering with trusted local organizations to distribute community solar to their membership, conducting outreach efforts and managing the customer experience. There is currently an opportunity to buy into a new solar installation right in your own back yard in Laurens.  To learn more, contact Jackie Burke at 607-345-4816 or jackie@solstice.us or Tim Brown at 607-241-0125 or tim@solstice.us.

Did You Know?

Though ticks are often associated with summer, adult black-legged ticks (Ioxedes scapularis, also known as deer ticks) are most active beginning in October. Adult ticks that have previously bitten an infected animal at an earlier stage in their life are capable of transmitting Lyme disease and a host of other illnesses, including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis and Powassan disease. Any sort of warm weather (and “warm” includes high 30s/low 40s, temperature wise) can bring out adult black-legged ticks that haven’t fed yet. Always take precautions when outdoors in tick season.