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COOPERSTOWN – The Tuesday, November 25 meeting of the Otsego County Water Quality Coordinating Committee will feature a presentation by Carter L. Bailey titled “Canadarago Lake Watershed Protection Plan: Working Together for a Common Goal.”

Canadarago Lake is a 2,000-acre lake of glacial origin, located in northern Otsego County. Numerous groups, municipalities, and organizations are concerned with the water quality and management of natural resources within the lake and surrounding watershed.

In October, the Canadarago Lake Improvement Association announced the completion of the Canadarago Lake Watershed Protection Plan. Bailey – a graduate student in SUNY Oneonta’s lake management program and project coordinator – will provide insight into the process of drafting a bottom-up comprehensive lake management plan and will discuss struggles, achievements, strategies, and where the process currently stands.

“Although the plan has been put together and numerous investigative studies have been completed, there is a tremendous amount of work to be done,” Bailey said. “We hope members of the Otsego County Water Quality Coordinating Committee and the public can attend this presentation as we continue the process of working together for a common goal.”

The WQCC meeting, which begins at 1 p.m. in Classroom A of The Meadows Office Building, 140 County Hwy. 33W, Cooperstown, is hosted by the Otsego County Planning Department. This event is free and open to the public; pre-registration is required by Monday, November 24. Those interested in attending should e-mail WQCC Facilitator Darla M. Youngs atadmin@occainfo.org or call (607) 547-4488.

This event is made possible thanks to the Otsego County WQCC which, in order to better satisfy the educational component of its mission, has restructured its monthly meetings to include public information sessions. The OCWQCC was established in 1992 as a sub-committee of the Otsego County Soil and Water Conservation District. It is comprised of a diverse group of people representing state and local government agencies, non-profit organizations, academic institutions, and lake associations. These members have technical expertise and knowledge and are committed to working to improve and maintain the quality of water in Otsego County through the reduction of nonpoint source pollution within its boundaries.

For more information on the WQCC, visit www.otsegosoilandwater.com/waterqualitycc.html

The American chestnut was once one of the most common trees in the northeast, a giant in both size and importance. It was prized for the strength and durability of its wood while the nuts were a staple for humans and wildlife alike. However, the tree was not able to withstand the chestnut blight, a parasitic fungus accidentally introduced from Asia in the early 1900s. Within 50 years, the blight had wiped out virtually all mature chestnuts. Today, the American chestnut exists in our forests as a small tree sprouting from old stumps. Instead of giants more than 10 feet across, they rarely reach 20’ tall or get much more than 6 inches in diameter before the blight gets them. And they rarely produce viable nuts. Allen Nichols, president of the New York Chapter of The American Chestnut Foundation, will be the keynote speaker at OCCA’s Annual Dinner and Meeting on Monday, November 17. Nichols will provide an overview of the history of the American chestnut and TACF’s efforts at saving the species. The New York Chapter has been supporting the efforts of SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry for 25 years and has finally developed a truly blight-resistant American chestnut through genetic engineering, bringing TACF closer to achieving its goal: restoring this keystone species back into America’s forests.

Explore the 1,300-acre R. Milton Hick State Forest in Roseboom on Tuesday, November 11. Otsego County Conservation Association and the Susquehanna Chapter of Adirondack Mountain Club co-lead the approximately three-mile hike through a mix of forest types, including conifer plantations, various hardwoods, and regenerating forests in recently-logged areas. The trails follow logging roads and are mostly easy. Meet at the trailhead on Perry Hill Road in Roseboom, about 1.8 miles south of State Route 165, or about one mile north of County Road 34. From Route 165: Turn south on LaFleure Road. Bear left onto Perry Hill Road. Parking area is on the right 1.8 miles south of Route 165. From County Road 34: Turn north onto Jocslyn Road (no sign) which will become Perry Hill Road. The parking area is a little over one mile from County Road 34. An ADK-organized carpool will depart for the hike from the Price Chopper parking lot on State Route 7 in Oneonta at 9:15 a.m. For more information, or to pre-register, contact OCCA Program Director Jeff O’Handley at OCCA, (607) 547-4488, or programdirector@occainfo.org.

 

ECO-BULLETIN FROM OTSEGO COUNTY CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION

November 4, 2014: Vol. 7, No. 20

Eco-bulletin headlines this issue:

ANNUAL DINNER RESERVATIONS DUE BY MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10

HIKE IN ROSEBOOM PLANNED FOR NEXT TUESDAY

ALLEN NICHOLS TO GIVE DINNER KEYNOTE ADDRESS

HIGHWAY CLEANUP ALONG STATE ROUTE 80 SET FOR NOVEMBER 15

CONFERENCE ON IMPACTS OF FRACKING-RELATED ACTIVITIES TO BE HELDNOVEMBER 15

FARM COMMUNITY’S INPUT REQUESTED FOR PLAN UPDATE

OCCA SPONSORS FILM SHOWING ON NOVEMBER 8

NRCS-NY ANNOUNCES APPLICATION CUTOFF DATES FOR CONSERVATION PROGRAMS

‘CLOTHES’ THE LOOP NY KICKS OFF TOMORROW

OCCA SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER NOW WORKING FROM HOME

WATERSHED SYMPOSIUM OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

SILENT AUCTION DONATIONS MOST WELCOME!

ANNUAL DINNER RESERVATIONS DUE BY MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10:On Monday, November 17 the Otsego County Conservation Association will present its 2014 “Conservationist of the Year” award to the Canadarago Lake Improvement Association. “CLIA is being recognized for outstanding leadership, teamwork, and dedication,” said OCCA President Vicky M. Lentz, “and for its proactive approach to the protection and preservation of Canadarago Lake’s freshwater heritage for future generations.” CLIA, nominated by former OCCA Board member Pam Lea, has just completed the Canadarago Lake Watershed Protection Plan – the first of its kind for Canadarago Lake – and expanded its Lake Steward Program in 2014 to help prevent the spread of invasive species. OCCA will also present a Special Recognition for Lifetime Achievement to Edward Wesnofske for his contributions toward environmentally and economically sound solid waste solutions for Otsego County. Wesnofske was nominated by Otsego County Representatives James Powers and Keith McCarty. The award ceremony is part of OCCA’s Annual Dinner and Meeting, to be held at Holiday Inn Oneonta/Cooperstown, 5206 State Highway 23, Oneonta. This event includes a silent auction fundraiser as well as a presentation by Allen Nichols, president of the New York Chapter of The American Chestnut Foundation, on efforts to save and restore the American chestnut tree. “All Silent Auction proceeds will benefit OCCA’s programs to protect, preserve, and enhance the environment,” said OCCA Executive Director Darla M. Youngs. “Bring your checkbooks, and bid early and often!” Doors open at 6:00 p.m. for the Silent Auction preview. Items must be paid for at the end of the evening; cash or check only. Annual Dinner menu choices are roast prime rib of beef au jus, chicken stir fry or eggplant parmesan. All selections include seasonal green salad with house dressing; seasonal vegetables, potatoes, or rice; rolls with butter; apple crisp for dessert; and tea or coffee. There will be a cash bar with gourmet cheese assortment at 6:00 p.m., followed by the dinner and program at7 p.m. Reservations, $35 per person, are required by Monday, November 10. For more information, e-mail admin@occainfo.org or call (607) 547-4488. Invitation: http://occainfo.org/documents/OCCAAnnualDinnerInvite2014.pdf

HIKE IN ROSEBOOM PLANNED FOR NEXT TUESDAY: Explore the 1,300-acre R. Milton Hick State Forest in Roseboom on Tuesday, November 11. Otsego County Conservation Association and the Susquehanna Chapter of Adirondack Mountain Club co-lead the approximately three-mile hike through a mix of forest types, including conifer plantations, various hardwoods, and regenerating forests in recently-logged areas. The trails follow logging roads and are mostly easy. Meet at the trailhead on Perry Hill Road in Roseboom, about 1.8 miles south of State Route 165, or about 1 mile north of County Road 34. From Route 165: Turn south on LaFleure Road. Bear left onto Perry Hill Road. Parking area is on the right 1.8 miles south of Route 165. From County Road 34: Turn north onto Jocslyn Road (no sign) which will become Perry Hill Road. The parking area is a little over one mile from County Road 34. For more information, or to pre-register, contact OCCA Program Director Jeff O’Handley at OCCA, (607) 547-4488, orprogramdirector@occainfo.org.

ALLEN NICHOLS TO GIVE DINNER KEYNOTE ADDRESS: The American chestnut was once one of the most common trees in the northeast, a giant in both size and importance. It was prized for the strength and durability of its wood while the nuts were a staple for humans and wildlife alike. However, the tree was not able to withstand the chestnut blight, a parasitic fungus accidentally introduced from Asia in the early 1900s. Within 50 years, the blight had wiped out virtually all mature chestnuts. Today, the American chestnut exists in our forests as a small tree sprouting from old stumps. Instead of giants more than 10 feet across, they rarely reach 20’ tall or get much more than 6 inches in diameter before the blight gets them. And they rarely produce viable nuts. Allen Nichols, president of the New York Chapter of The American Chestnut Foundation, will be the keynote speaker at OCCA’s Annual Dinner and Meeting on Monday, November 17. Nichols will provide an overview of the history of the American chestnut and TACF’s efforts at saving the species. The New York Chapter has been supporting the efforts of SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry for 25 years and has finally developed a truly blight-resistant American chestnut through genetic engineering, bringing TACF closer to achieving its goal: restoring this keystone species back into America’s forests.

HIGHWAY CLEANUP ALONG STATE ROUTE 80 SET FOR NOVEMBER 15:  Join Otsego County Conservation Association on Saturday, November 15 for one last highway cleanup before winter. In 2013, OCCA took responsibility for litter pick-up on a two-mile stretch of State Route 80 in Springfield as part of New York State’s Adopt-A-Highway program. Volunteers will meet at OCCA’s office at Mohican Farm, 7193 State Route 80, at 9 a.m. and will work until about noon. Dress for the weather. Safety equipment, bags and rubber gloves are provided; light refreshments will be served. Ages 12 and up; pre-registration is required. Call OCCA Program Director Jeff O’Handley at (607) 282-4087 to register.

CONFERENCE ON IMPACTS OF FRACKING-RELATED ACTIVITIES TO BE HELD NOVEMBER 15: A one-day conference, “Collateral Damage from Fracking: Coming Together to Protect Communities,” will be held on Saturday, November 15 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Ithaca College. Municipal officials, activists, and lawyers will present on topics including infrastructure for transporting and storing gas (pipelines, compressor stations, export facilities, underground storage), air pollution (methane, ozone, vehicle emissions, radon, and other toxic substances), waste disposal (wastewater disposal, landfills, brine spreading on roads), and transportation (road use, rail transport). David Slottje, Community Environmental Defense Council, will be the keynote speaker. Admission is $15. To register bySunday, November 9, visit http://www.stopfrackgasdamageny.org/registration.htm.

FARM COMMUNITY’S INPUT REQUESTED FOR PLAN UPDATE:Otsego County will host four public forums between November and February where farmers can speak directly to the Otsego County Farmland Protection Plan Committee regarding the 2014 update to the Otsego County Agricultural and Farmland Protection Plan. The plan’s goal is to create a framework for protecting, preserving and enhancing farming in Otsego County. All producers large and small are encouraged to attend, from part-time beekeepers to large dairy operations. Refreshments and snacks will be provided. The dates and locations of the forums are:

  • Wednesday, November 12: 6:30 p.m., Burlington Baptist Church, 2225 St Hwy 80, Burlington (intersection of County Highway 16 and State Route 80)
  • Wednesday, December 17: 6:30 p.m., Town of Otego Town Building, 3526 Route 7, Otego
  • Wednesday, January 14: 6:30 p.m., Richfield Community Center, 6 Ann Street, Richfield Springs
  • Wednesday February 18: 6:30 p.m., Town of Worcester Town Building, 29 Katie Lane, Worcester

Those who plan on attending the public forums are strongly encouraged to RSVP to Jordan Clements, district manager with the Otsego County Soil and Water Conservation District, at (607) 547-8337 extension 4 or jclements0612@gmail.com. The original Otsego County Agricultural and Farmland Protection Plan, adopted in 1999, was designed with the goals of protecting, preserving, and enhancing farming in Otsego County and to ensure that Otsego County remains home to productive agriculture in the future.  The current strategic goals include promoting awareness of agriculture’s importance in the economy, developing farmland protection measures and identifying ways to make local farms financially stable. The forums will provide an opportunity for the public and farming community members to voice their suggestions and concerns to county officials and agricultural agencies.  The committee members hope that the update to the existing plan will offer an opportunity to actively engage farmers and include their perspectives in the final document. The forums offer participants the opportunity to learn the results of the surveys administered to the farming community in March of 2014. There will also be extra surveys on hand for those who did not fill one out and would like to contribute their information and data to the update process. The farmer’s survey, administered earlier this year, played an important role in the update process and will be augmented with feedback from the farming community at the public forums. The AFPP update is being made possible with funding from New York State’s Department of Agriculture and Markets and The Scriven Foundation, and is being administered on behalf of the Otsego County Agricultural and Farmland Protection Board by the Otsego County Planning Department and in partnership with local agricultural agencies.

OCCA SPONSORS SHOWING OF FILM ON NOVEMBER 8: OnSaturday, November 8 at 1:30 p.m., OCCA will sponsor the screening of “La Ligne de Partage des Eaux” during Glimmerglass Film Days, a program of Otsego 2000. This film looks at the relationship between the Loire River’s watershed and its people, and will provoke comparisons to our own Susquehanna River and its residents. Hope to see you there! For more on this film and/or Glimmerglass Film Days, please see: http://www.glimmerglassfilmdays.org/films/#/la-ligne-de-partage-des-eaux/

NRCS-NY ANNOUNCES APPLICATION CUTOFF DATES FOR CONSERVATION PROGRAMS: New York Natural Resources Conservation Service has announced November 21, 2014 as the application cutoff date for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) for Fiscal Year 2015. Applications accepted after November 21, 2014 may be considered for funding if additional application rounds are announced or for potential consideration in FY2016. All applications are competitive and are ranked based on national, state and locally identified resource priorities and the overall benefit to the environment. “NRCS provides New York’s agricultural producers with financial and technical assistance to treat the resource concerns on the land,” said Gregory Kist, NRCS state conservationist. “Our programs are as diverse as New York’s agriculture, providing exciting opportunities for all of New York’s agricultural producers to work with us.” Environmental Quality Incentives Program: offers financial assistance for practices which address soil erosion, water quality and habitat degradation. Practices implemented through EQIP include strip cropping, grassed waterways and manure storage facilities. Focus areas within the EQIP program include soil health, livestock waste, habitat, forestry and grazing. If you are interested in applying for an NRCS conservation program, contact District Conservationist Anthony Capraro or Soil Conservation Technician Jeanine Harter locally to determine eligibility or visit the NRCS website for more information on applying: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/ny/programs/financial/eqip/?cid=nrcs144p2_027058.

‘CLOTHES’ THE LOOP NY KICKS OFF TOMORROW: The New York State Association of Reduction, Reuse, and Recycling – in conjunction with the Secondary Materials and Recycled Textiles Association, and the Council for Textile Recycling – is kicking off a state-wide campaign, “Clothes” the Loop NY, focusing on clothing and textile recycling. Throughout the state, municipalities will be initiating an educational campaign that encourages New York State residents to “Clothes” the Loop by recycling their unwanted clothing and household textiles instead of putting them into the trash. “Clothes” the Loop will kick off tomorrow, November 5, at NYSAR3’s annual recycling conference at The Otesaga Resort Hotel in Cooperstown. Otsego County residents are invited to participate in a textile collection event on November 5 and 6. Textile collection containers will be set up in The Otesaga parking lot from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.both days for local residents to donate unwanted textiles for reuse and recycling.Local officials from Cooperstown and Otsego County will be invited to participate in a ribbon cutting ceremony on Wednesday, November 5 at a time to be determined. Acceptable materials are as follow. footwear: shoes, heels (wedges, pumps), flats, sandals, flip flops, boots (work boots, dress boots, winter boots), sneakers, cleats, slippers; clothing: tops (T-shirts, blouses, shirts, tank tops), sweaters, sweatshirts, dresses; outerwear (coats, jackets, blazers), bottoms (pants, slacks, jeans, sweatpants, skirts, shorts); undergarments, socks, pajamas, slips; accessories: hats, bags (pocketbooks, duffle bags, totes), belts, gloves, ties, scarves, bathrobes; linens: sheets, blankets, drapes, aprons, dish towels, table linens, comforters, throw rugs, placemats; other: all stuffed animals; not acceptable: no rugs or carpeting, items stained with blood or grease, or items that are moldy. For more information on NYSAR3, seehttp://www.nysar3.org/. To learn more about “Clothes” the Loop NY, visit:http://www.nysar3.org/page/clothes-the-loop-ny—home-78.html.

OCCA SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER NOW WORKING FROM HOME:OCCA has closed its satellite office at 101 Main Street, Cooperstown and Special Projects Manager Martha Clarvoe is now working from home. Items for OCCA’s TerraCycle collection are still being accepted in the receptacle outside the Cooperstown Farmers’ Market in Pioneer Alley and are limited to: any brand used toothpaste tubes, toothbrushes and plastic toothbrush packaging; any brand of flexible cheese packaging, including string cheeses packages, individual singles wrappers, singles packages, shredded cheeses packages, grated cheese, and all flexible cheese wrappers; any empty brand or size chip bag; diaper packaging waste, including plastic diaper packaging, wipes outer plastic packaging and individual wipes packaging; any size Elmer’s brand glue sticks, plastic glue bottles, refill jars and Elmer’s glitter glue tubes (Elmer’s only); all plastic cereal bags and cereal bag liners of any brand; any brand pens and pen caps, mechanical pencils, markers and marker caps, permanent markets and permanent marker caps. For recycling of toner cartridges, video tapes and other items collected by OCCA, make arrangements by contacting Clarvoe directly at (607) 293-6654 or martha.clarvoe@gmail.com.

WATERSHED SYMPOSIUM OPEN TO THE PUBLIC: The Watershed Sciences and Engineering Program at the Bucknell University Center for Sustainability and the Environment will hold its 9th Annual Susquehanna River Symposium, “Science and the River,” on Friday and Saturday, November 21 and 22, in Lewisburg, PA. This event brings together researchers, managers, consultants, and the public to discuss ongoing scientific research and innovative projects, to share ideas, and to increase awareness of watershed health, management, and sustainability issues facing the Susquehanna region today. The symposium also highlights ongoing studies by students and faculty in the Susquehanna River Heartland Coalition for Environmental Studies. Featured themes will deal with watershed hydrology, water resources engineering, restoration and remediation, aquatic and riparian corridor ecosystems, watershed management and policy, lakes and wetlands, land use, and climate change. All presentations are free and open to the public. For more information and to register, visit: http://www.eg.bucknell.edu/sri/river_symposiums/2014/index.html.

SILENT AUCTION DONATIONS MOST WELCOME! OCCA’s popular Silent Auction will be featured again this year at the Annual Dinner and Meeting. All Silent Auction proceeds will benefit OCCA’s programs to protect, preserve and enhance the environment. Those wishing to donate an item or service should e-mail OCCA Executive Director Darla M. Youngs at admin@occainfo.org for more information. Items donated to date include: vintage books from Leather Stalking Books – “Adventures in the Wilderness, or, Camp-life in the Adirondacks” by William H. H. Murray (first edition, 1869) and “The Niagara” by Donald Braider (sixty-second volume in the “Rivers of America” series; first edition, 1972); signed and matted photograph by Richard S. Duncan; 54-inch Whistle Creek hickory hiking staff; framed bathymetric print of Otsego Lake; handmade bedspreads, circa 1940; Luci inflatable solar lantern; guided barge tour of Otsego Lake with the SUNY Oneonta Biological Field Station; two Deborah Geurtze originals; Cooperstown Concert Series tickets; T-shirts made from recycled water bottles; pottery, jewelry, artwork, and a host of other great services, merchandise, and gift certificates.

OTHER UPCOMING EVENTS:

For more information on OCCA-organized volunteer opportunities and hikes, visit http://www.occainfo.org/EnviroEventsCal.htm or e-mail admin@occainfo.org.

OCCA RELIES ON YOUR SUPPORT. Got a minute? Visit our website and look at everything OCCA is doing – and please consider an online donation whenever you can. Click on www.occainfo.org and look for the Network for Good logo at the top left of the home page to make a donation today.

ECO-BULLETIN FROM OTSEGO COUNTY CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION

OCTOBER 24, 2014: Vol. 7, No. 19

Eco-bulletin headlines this issue:

OCCA ANNOUNCES CONSERVATIONIST OF THE YEAR, ANNUAL DINNER

STORMWATER EDUCATION PROJECT AT GLIMMERGLASS STATE PARK TO BE DISCUSSED

MUD LAKE HIKE FEATURES WATERFALLS, HISTORY

NRCS-NY ANNOUNCES APPLICATION CUTOFF DATES FOR CONSERVATION PROGRAMS

OCCA ANNOUNCES CONSERVATIONIST OF THE YEAR, ANNUAL DINNER: On Monday, November 17 the Otsego County Conservation Association will present its 2014 “Conservationist of the Year” award to the Canadarago Lake Improvement Association. “CLIA is being recognized for outstanding leadership, teamwork, and dedication,” said OCCA President Vicky M. Lentz, “and for its proactive approach to the protection and preservation of Canadarago Lake’s freshwater heritage for future generations.” CLIA, nominated by former OCCA Board member Pam Lea, has just completed the Canadarago Lake Watershed Protection Plan – the first of its kind for Canadarago Lake – and expanded its Lake Steward Program in 2014 to help prevent the spread of invasive species. OCCA will also present a Special Recognition for Lifetime Achievement to Edward Wesnofske for his contributions toward environmentally and economically sound solid waste solutions for Otsego County. Wesnofske was nominated by Otsego County Representatives James Powers and Keith McCarty. The award ceremony is part of OCCA’s Annual Dinner and Meeting, to be held at Holiday Inn Oneonta/Cooperstown, 5206 State Highway 23, Oneonta. This event includes a silent auction fundraiser as well as a presentation by Allen Nichols, president of the New York Chapter of The American Chestnut Foundation, on efforts to save and restore the American chestnut tree. “All Silent Auction proceeds will benefit OCCA’s programs to protect, preserve, and enhance the environment,” said OCCA Executive Director Darla M. Youngs. “Bring your checkbooks, and bid early and often!” Doors open at 6:00 p.m. for the Silent Auction preview. Items must be paid for at the end of the evening; cash or check only. Annual Dinner menu choices are roast prime rib of beef au jus, chicken stir fry or eggplant parmesan. All selections include seasonal green salad with house dressing; seasonal vegetables, potatoes, or rice; rolls with butter; apple crisp for dessert; and tea or coffee. There will be a cash bar with gourmet cheese assortment at 6:00 p.m., followed by the dinner and program at7 p.m. Reservations, $35 per person, are required by Monday, November 10. For more information, e-mail admin@occainfo.org or call (607) 547-4488.

STORMWATER EDUCATION PROJECT AT GLIMMERGLASS STATE PARK TO BE DISCUSSED: The Wednesday, October 29 meeting of the Otsego County Water Quality Coordinating Committee will feature a presentation by Katie Mulverhill, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Mulverhill, environmental educator for NYSOPRHP, will provide an update on the interpretive panels funded through WQCC to provide education about the innovative new parking lot at Glimmerglass State Park. In 2013, the park’s parking lot was rehabilitated to help reduce the volume and improve the quality of stormwater runoff into Otsego Lake. Mulverhill will discuss the goals of this initiative, a NY Works project: to provide universal accessibility, construct new recreational areas, and incorporate new design elements to help protect our natural resources. The interpretive panels will simply and artistically show the environmental benefits of reducing the paved area of the parking lot using bioswales and a reinforced grass parking system. The WQCC meeting, which begins at 1 p.m. in Classroom A of The Meadows Office Building, 140 County Hwy. 33W, Cooperstown, is hosted by the Otsego County Planning Department. This event is free and open to the public; pre-registration is required by Monday, October 27. Those interested in attending should e-mail WQCC Facilitator Darla M. Youngs atadmin@occainfo.org or call (607) 547-4488. According to the Friends of Glimmerglass State Park website: “The new parking lot near the beach was constructed using technology which provides a cool, grass surface for cars and trucks to park on and is part of the New York State Parks Department’s sustainable design strategy. This system protects and enhances the environment by allowing for natural filtration of water into the ground, which is not possible with traditional concrete or asphalt paving. Additionally, it reduces erosion and soil migration, and promotes the conversion of carbon dioxide while reducing the ‘urban heat island’ effect. Bioswales are a necessary partner in this system to manage stormwater. They collect surface water from the paved areas of the parking lot and filter it to remove silt and pollutants. In addition, bioswales allow the surface water the chance to infiltrate into the ground, and in cases of heavy rain events, filter the water before it is released into the pre-existing storm water drains.” This event is made possible thanks to the Otsego County WQCC which, in order to better satisfy the educational component of its mission, has restructured its monthly meetings to include public information sessions. The OCWQCC was established in 1992 as a sub-committee of the Otsego County Soil and Water Conservation District. It is comprised of a diverse group of people representing state and local government agencies, non-profit organizations, academic institutions, and lake associations. These members have technical expertise and knowledge and are committed to working to improve and maintain the quality of water in Otsego County through the reduction of nonpoint source pollution within its boundaries. For more information on the WQCC, visitwww.otsegosoilandwater.com/waterqualitycc.html

MUD LAKE HIKE FEATURES WATERFALLS, HISTORY: Mud Lake is the destination for a long hike in Robert V. Riddell State Park onOctober 25 at noon. This 4.5-mile hike, sponsored by Otsego County Conservation Association, will be led by Patricia Riddell Kent and Steve Kent, who donated the park land. It will take hikers up and over South Hill in the 800-acre portion of the park. Mud Lake and a 30-foot waterfall will be among the visual highlights of the trip. Along the way, the Kents will discuss the natural and human history of the area. “Trish and Steve are full of passion and enthusiasm for the park,” said Jeff O’Handley, OCCA’s program director. “They have a lot of great memories and stories to share.” Participants should meet at the Pine Lake Campus of Hartwick College on Charlotte Creek Road in Davenport at noon. From there, the group will carpool to the park entrance on Gersoni Road and hike back to Pine Lake via South Hill and Mud Lake. Participants should expect to spend four hours on the trail and should bring plenty of water and a snack. For more information or to register for the Mud Lake hike, call OCCA at (607) 547-4488 or e-mailprogramdirector@occainfo.org.

NRCS-NY ANNOUNCES APPLICATION CUTOFF DATES FOR CONSERVATION PROGRAMS: New York Natural Resources Conservation Service has announced November 21, 2014 as the application cutoff date for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) for Fiscal Year 2015. Applications accepted after November 21, 2014 may be considered for funding if additional application rounds are announced or for potential consideration in FY2016. All applications are competitive and are ranked based on national, state and locally identified resource priorities and the overall benefit to the environment. “NRCS provides New York’s agricultural producers with financial and technical assistance to treat the resource concerns on the land,” said Gregory Kist, NRCS state conservationist. “Our programs are as diverse as New York’s agriculture, providing exciting opportunities for all of New York’s agricultural producers to work with us.” Environmental Quality Incentives Program: offers financial assistance for practices which address soil erosion, water quality and habitat degradation. Practices implemented through EQIP include strip cropping, grassed waterways and manure storage facilities. Focus areas within the EQIP program include soil health, livestock waste, habitat, forestry and grazing. If you are interested in applying for an NRCS conservation program, contact District Conservationist Anthony Capraro or Soil Conservation Technician Jeanine Harter locally to determine eligibility or visit the NRCS website for more information on applying: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/ny/programs/financial/eqip/?cid=nrcs144p2_027058.

OTHER UPCOMING EVENTS:

  • Nature walk, “Hick State Forest, offered in cooperation with Susquehanna Chapter Adirondack Mountain Club,November 11.

For more information on OCCA-organized volunteer opportunities and hikes, visit http://www.occainfo.org/EnviroEventsCal.htm or e-mail admin@occainfo.org.

OCCA RELIES ON YOUR SUPPORT. Got a minute? Visit our website and look at everything OCCA is doing – and please consider an online donation whenever you can. Click on www.occainfo.org and look for the Network for Good logo at the top left of the home page to make a donation today.

COOPERSTOWN – The Tuesday, October 29 meeting of the Otsego County Water Quality Coordinating Committee will feature a presentation by Katie Mulverhill, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Mulverhill, environmental educator for NYSOPRHP, will provide an update on the interpretive panels funded through WQCC to provide education about the innovative new parking lot at Glimmerglass State Park.

In 2013, the park’s parking lot was rehabilitated to help reduce the volume and improve the quality of stormwater runoff into Otsego Lake. Mulverhill will discuss the goals of this initiative, a NY Works project: to provide universal accessibility, construct new recreational areas, and incorporate new design elements to help protect our natural resources. The interpretive panels will simply and artistically show the environmental benefits of reducing the paved area of the parking lot using bioswales and a reinforced grass parking system.

The WQCC meeting, which begins at 1 p.m. in Classroom A of The Meadows Office Building, 140 County Hwy. 33W, Cooperstown, is hosted by the Otsego County Planning Department. This event is free and open to the public; pre-registration is required by Monday, October 27. Those interested in attending should e-mail WQCC Facilitator Darla M. Youngs atadmin@occainfo.org or call (607) 547-4488.

According to the Friends of Glimmerglass State Park website: “The new parking lot near the beach was constructed using technology which provides a cool, grass surface for cars and trucks to park on and is part of the New York State Parks Department’s sustainable design strategy. This system protects and enhances the environment by allowing for natural filtration of water into the ground, which is not possible with traditional concrete or asphalt paving. Additionally, it reduces erosion and soil migration, and promotes the conversion of carbon dioxide while reducing the ‘urban heat island’ effect. Bioswales are a necessary partner in this system to manage stormwater. They collect surface water from the paved areas of the parking lot and filter it to remove silt and pollutants. In addition, bioswales allow the surface water the chance to infiltrate into the ground, and in cases of heavy rain events, filter the water before it is released into the pre-existing storm water drains.”

This event is made possible thanks to the Otsego County WQCC which, in order to better satisfy the educational component of its mission, has restructured its monthly meetings to include public information sessions. The OCWQCC was established in 1992 as a sub-committee of the Otsego County Soil and Water Conservation District. It is comprised of a diverse group of people representing state and local government agencies, non-profit organizations, academic institutions, and lake associations. These members have technical expertise and knowledge and are committed to working to improve and maintain the quality of water in Otsego County through the reduction of nonpoint source pollution within its boundaries.

For more information on the WQCC, visit www.otsegosoilandwater.com/waterqualitycc.html

COOPERSTOWN – The Wednesday, October 29 meeting of the Otsego County Water Quality Coordinating Committee will feature a presentation by Katie Mulverhill, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Mulverhill, environmental educator for NYSOPRHP, will provide an update on the interpretive panels funded through WQCC to provide education about the innovative new parking lot at Glimmerglass State Park.

In 2013, the park’s parking lot was rehabilitated to help reduce the volume and improve the quality of stormwater runoff into Otsego Lake. Mulverhill will discuss the goals of this initiative, a NY Works project: to provide universal accessibility, construct new recreational areas, and incorporate new design elements to help protect our natural resources. The interpretive panels will simply and artistically show the environmental benefits of reducing the paved area of the parking lot using bioswales and a reinforced grass parking system.

The WQCC meeting, which begins at 1 p.m. in Classroom A of The Meadows Office Building, 140 County Hwy. 33W, Cooperstown, is hosted by the Otsego County Planning Department. This event is free and open to the public; pre-registration is required by Monday, October 27. Those interested in attending should e-mail WQCC Facilitator Darla M. Youngs atadmin@occainfo.org or call (607) 547-4488.

According to the Friends of Glimmerglass State Park website: “The new parking lot near the beach was constructed using technology which provides a cool, grass surface for cars and trucks to park on and is part of the New York State Parks Department’s sustainable design strategy. This system protects and enhances the environment by allowing for natural filtration of water into the ground, which is not possible with traditional concrete or asphalt paving. Additionally, it reduces erosion and soil migration, and promotes the conversion of carbon dioxide while reducing the ‘urban heat island’ effect. Bioswales are a necessary partner in this system to manage stormwater. They collect surface water from the paved areas of the parking lot and filter it to remove silt and pollutants. In addition, bioswales allow the surface water the chance to infiltrate into the ground, and in cases of heavy rain events, filter the water before it is released into the pre-existing storm water drains.”

This event is made possible thanks to the Otsego County WQCC which, in order to better satisfy the educational component of its mission, has restructured its monthly meetings to include public information sessions. The OCWQCC was established in 1992 as a sub-committee of the Otsego County Soil and Water Conservation District. It is comprised of a diverse group of people representing state and local government agencies, non-profit organizations, academic institutions, and lake associations. These members have technical expertise and knowledge and are committed to working to improve and maintain the quality of water in Otsego County through the reduction of nonpoint source pollution within its boundaries.

For more information on the WQCC, visit www.otsegosoilandwater.com/waterqualitycc.html

COOPERSTOWN – On Monday, November 17 the Otsego County Conservation Association will present its 2014 “Conservationist of the Year” award to the Canadarago Lake Improvement Association.

“CLIA is being recognized for outstanding leadership, teamwork, and dedication,” said OCCA President Vicky M. Lentz, “and for its proactive approach to the protection and preservation of Canadarago Lake’s freshwater heritage for future generations.”

CLIA, nominated by former OCCA Board member Pam Lea, is currently in has just completed the Canadarago Lake Watershed Protection Plan – the first of its kind for Canadarago Lake – and expanded its Lake Steward Program in 2014 to help prevent the spread of invasive species.

OCCA will also present a Special Recognition for Lifetime Achievement to Edward Wesnofske for his contributions toward environmentally and economically sound solid waste solutions for Otsego County. Wesnofske was nominated by Otsego County Representatives James Powers and Keith McCarty.

The award ceremony is part of OCCA’s Annual Dinner and Meeting, to be held at Holiday Inn Oneonta/Cooperstown, 5206 State Highway 23, Oneonta. This event includes a silent auction fundraiser as well as a presentation by Allen Nichols, president of the New York Chapter of The American Chestnut Foundation, on efforts to save and restore the American chestnut tree.

“All Silent Auction proceeds will benefit OCCA’s programs to protect, preserve, and enhance the environment,” said OCCA Executive Director Darla M. Youngs. “Bring your checkbooks, and bid early and often!”

Doors open at 6:00 p.m. for the Silent Auction preview. Items must be paid for at the end of the evening; cash or check only.

Annual Dinner menu choices are roast prime rib of beef au jus, chicken stir fry or eggplant parmesan. All selections include seasonal green salad with house dressing; seasonal vegetables, potatoes, or rice; rolls with butter; apple crisp for dessert; and tea or coffee. There will be a cash bar with gourmet cheese assortment at 6:00 p.m., followed by the dinner and program at 7 p.m. Reservations, $35 per person, are required by Monday, November 10. For more information, e-mail admin@occainfo.org or call (607) 547-4488.

OCCA is a private, non-profit environmental membership organization dedicated to promoting the appreciation and sustainable use of Otsego County’s natural resources through education, advocacy, resource management, research, and planning. For more information on OCCA, or to support programming, call(607) 547-4488 or visit www.occainfo.org.

Overlook

DAVENPORT – Mud Lake is the destination for a long hike in Robert V. Riddell State Park on October 25 at noon.

This 4.5-mile hike, sponsored by Otsego County Conservation Association, will be led by Patricia Riddell Kent and Steve Kent, who donated the park land. It will take hikers up and over South Hill in the 800-acre portion of the park. Mud Lake and a 30-foot waterfall will be among the visual highlights of the trip. Along the way, the Kents will discuss the natural and human history of the area.

“Trish and Steve are full of passion and enthusiasm for the park,” said Jeff O’Handley, OCCA’s program director. “They have a lot of great memories and stories to share.”

Participants should meet at the Pine Lake Campus of Hartwick College on Charlotte Creek Road in Davenport at noon. From there, the group will carpool to the park entrance on Gersoni Road and hike back to Pine Lake via South Hill and Mud Lake. Participants should expect to spend four hours on the trail and should bring plenty of water and a snack.

For more information or to register for the Mud Lake hike, call OCCA at(607) 547-4488 or e-mail programdirector@occainfo.org.

Eco-bulletin headlines this issue:

ASH TREES NEEDED

OCCA CO-HOSTS GEOLOGY THEMED NATURE WALK

ANNUAL DINNER TO BE HELD IN ONEONTA

ASH TREES NEEDED: If you have ash trees on your property, we want to hear from you! OCCA is participating in a program led by the United States Forest Service’s National Seed Lab. The goal of this project is to preserve the genetic diversity of ash species before their expected loss to the emerald ash borer. Collecting and saving the seeds now will allow scientists greater ability to restore ash populations once an effective method of controlling the invasive beetle is found. We specifically need non-cultivated specimens of native ash – black ash, white ash and green ash – that are currently producing seeds. If you have access to one or more trees of any of these species and would like to help, contact OCCA Program Director Jeff O’Handley at (607) 282-4087 orprogramdirector@occainfo.org.

OCCA CO-HOSTS GEOLOGY THEMED NATURE WALK: Join OCCA, the Otsego Land Trust and local geology professor Dr. Les Hasbargen for a walk along the trails on the Otsquago Creek in Van Hornesville on Saturday, October 18 at 1 p.m. See amazing geological features including caves and waterfalls and learn about their formation.Meet at the trailhead of the Robert B. Woodruff Outdoor Learning Center behind Owen D. Young Central School, 2316 State Highway 80, Van Hornesville. The walk is free and open to the public. Children are welcome when accompanied by an adult; no dogs please. Hot cider and donuts will be served following the hike. Contact OCCA Program Director Jeff O’Handley at (607) 282-4087 orprogramdirector@occainfo.org for information or to register.

ANNUAL DINNER TO BE HELD IN ONEONTA: OCCA’s Annual Dinner and Meeting will be held on Monday, November 17 at the Holiday Inn Oneonta/Cooperstown, 5206 State Highway 23. There will be a Silent Auction preview and cocktail hour beginning at 6 p.m.; dinner will be served at 7 p.m. The program includes: welcome, Silent Auction overview, dinner, presentation of OCCA Conservationist of the Year, keynote address, election of directors, Silent Auction results/checkout. Dinner is a choice of roast prime rib of beef au jus, chicken stir fry or eggplant parmesan with apple crisp for dessert. The cost to attend is $35 per person; reservations required. This year’s Conservationist of the Year award winner and keynote speaker to be announced later this week. For more information, call (607) 547-4488.

OTHER UPCOMING EVENTS:

  • “Mud Lake Hike” at Robert V. Riddell State Park with Patricia Riddell Kent and Steve Kent, October 25.
  • Nature walk, Hick State Forest, offered in cooperation with Susquehanna Chapter Adirondack Mountain Club,November 11.

For more information on OCCA-organized volunteer opportunities and hikes, visit http://www.occainfo.org or e-mail admin@occainfo.org.

OCCA RELIES ON YOUR SUPPORT. Got a minute? Visit our website and look at everything OCCA is doing – and please consider an online donation whenever you can. Click on www.occainfo.org and look for the Network for Good logo at the top left of the home page to make a donation today.